Articles Tagged with DUI Arrest

The laws in Nevada are constantly being amended or changed, both by courts and lawmakers. It is imperative, that when you are charged with a DUI in Nevada, you have a lawyer who is up to date on changes in the law.  In order to have the best lawyer for your DUI charge, you must have an attorney who is aware of the current state of DUI law and how best to use those laws to build your defense.

A good example of a change in the law that those charged with a DUI should be aware of is Assembly Bill 67 (AB67).  This new law was voted into place unanimously and has many significant changes for those charged with a DUI in Nevada.

One main component of the bill is that removes the antiquated legal principle of “implied consent” to allow law enforcement to take a forensic blood or breath sample. While a Nevada driver can still consent to either test, if a driver refuses to voluntarily to take a test, a warrant is now required before the blood can be taken.  Moreover, if a driver refuses to submit to a test, his or her license is subject to revocation for a period of one (1) year following the refusal.

Additionally, prior to AB 67, a legal document known as an “Affidavit” allowed to be submitted in trial to attempt to prove a DUI charge unless the Defendant established a “substantial and bona fide” dispute as to the facts in the Affidavit prior to Trial.  Following AB 67, and Affidavit to prove facts at Trial is not admissible if the Defendant (or his lawyer) objects 10 or more days prior to Trial.  This requires the prosecutor to bring in the witness, instead of a sheet of paper, to prove their case and allows for a defense attorney to thoroughly cross examine the witness on the content of their testimony.

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It is no secret that one of the most aggressively investigated and charged crimes in Nevada is Driving Under the Influence, also known as “DUI.” One of the more commonly used techniques to identify and arrest alleged drunk drivers is the “DUI checkpoint.”

When the topic of DUI arrests and DUI checkpoints is brought up to me in conversation, one of the more common questions I am asked is “wait a second…how are DUI checkpoints legal?” And, “are these DUI check points even constitutional?”

While there are lots of variables and the individual facts of each case are unique, in most situations, if a member of law enforcement desires to stop a vehicle driving on a roadway, that law enforcement officer needs to have “probable cause” … or a belief that it is likely that a crime has been committed and that the driver of that vehicle committed that crime. The most common example is when a police officer conducts a traffic stop and pulls someone over for the commission of a moving violation, or “traffic offense” in the officer’s presence.  This gives the officer “probable cause” to stop the driver.

In the case if a DUI checkpoint however, the situation is different. While law enforcement does stop drivers at checkpoints, this method of stopping drivers does not require probable cause as does the typical traffic stop.  Continue reading